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Imagine…
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One day you’re living a normal, active life, full of friends and social activities—living and loving life to its fullest and the next, you’re waking up in a hospital bed unable to remember what you just had for breakfast, learning that you are unable to walk or talk or even feed yourself. Over the next several months you will have to work very hard, through all the pain, to regain at least some of what you once took for granted would always be there. You find yourself wondering how it was even possible to have lost it all in the first place. Months and years may pass before even the simplest things become second nature again (if ever). Your friends have slowly moved on with their lives while your days are spent in hospitals and rehabilitation facilities. You and your family become more and more isolated as you struggle to redefine your lives following a brain injury.

You may be a young adult just getting started in life, looking forward to striking out on your own, or you may be an older adult with a family and a career that you worked very hard for. But now, because of your physical, cognitive, or emotional limitations, you can no longer attend regular classes at college or maintain your focus to continue on with your job. You are no longer able to drive a car and may need assistance when leaving the confines of your own home because your memory, vision, or physical ability makes venturing out on your own a safety issue. So, most of your days are now spent at home alone or, if you’re lucky, in the company of a family member who has become your primary caregiver, supporter, and friend. This is often the new life of a brain injury survivor—but it doesn’t have to be that way.

Since the onset of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, there have been great advances made in the treatment of traumatic and acquired brain injury, however, social reintegration is one of the most overlooked and underfunded areas of recovery. Following such a traumatic event and long recovery, many survivors and their families are also left with overwhelming medical costs and financial hardships that result from taking so much time away from their jobs. And while some survivors may eventually be able to return to work in a more limited capacity, many remain unemployable due to their disability. As a consequence, they find themselves unable to include social activities as an important part of their ongoing recovery. That’s where we come in.

We’re MOVING FORWARD! was formally established as a 501 (c) (3) non-profit organization as a means to facilitate and fund social events and activities for brain injury survivors and their immediate family members. These events may range from a simple trip to the movies to a three day adventure out of town with adaptive cycling, kayaking, and a group barbeque as part of the weekend’s events. In the short time we have been in existence we’ve grown to include over 150 participants and followers just in the local Phoenix Metro area. As a group of this size it has become increasingly more difficult for us to find appropriate venues in which to hold many of our events or come up with the funds to pre-pay for events in order to get the best group discounts available. That’s where you come in.

Your generous donations allow us to offset these costs and continue offering this very important avenue for growth in a way that will allow us to reach more families and provide a wider range of group activities. Money raised through donations and other fundraising efforts go directly toward the funding of group events and activities and their associated costs. Our overhead is limited only to those expenses necessary to maintain the organizations infrastructure as there are no salaries to be drawn and no profit to be made by anyone involved in the management or operation of We’re MOVING FORWARD!

Thank you! Your support and generous donation is greatly appreciated!

As always, we encourage and welcome anyone whose life has been affected by brain injury and find themselves in similar circumstances to contact us and get involved!

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